The Family Without Borders

The Travelling family

Mexico

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Hammock, tv and coca-cola

Mexico (Yucatan): Family with monkey in the Village San-Angel; Photo: Thomas Alboth

Mexico (Yucatan): Family with monkey in the Village San-Angel; Photo: Thomas Alboth

San Angel, 800-people Maya community. One of the places where organisation Kanche is supporting the activities of indigenous people.

Already in the rain forest but still very close to Cancun (maybe 1,5 hour drive). Wet (during few days of our stay it was raining every few hours) but hot (so this rain doesn’t really matter). Main road with few small shops (where you can buy most imprint things but no chocolate or ice-cream: first a pity for Anna, second for Hanna), bike taxis driving around and bananas’ and oranges’ trees around the houses. Sun sets very fast and early (like everywhere here, after 5pm suddenly the light is off). The life in the village starts in this point, people are going for a walk, kids are occupying automats with games in front of the shops (btw, does anybody more than me, remember my favourite childhood game: Super Mario Bros?!, they have it there! and were super surprised when I was playing and using all the tricks). New Maya community, like many many others around the Yucatan Peninsula.

Many of them is going away to some touristic cities, to work in the restaurant or anything else. Many is never coming back. And if – in their the houses there are only three obligatory things: hammock, tv and coca-cola. And what to do not to loose of those beautiful habits and culture? In this place organisation Kanché comes with help. Lili, the head of the organisation, we met, explains us: – Sustainable development, through alternative tourism, is greatly welcomed in this corner of the peninsula by the rural communities’ entrepreneur groups that seek a better quality of life and the conservation of their habitat and culture.

So what they do is supporting and animating projects connected with tourism, but this alternative one: done by locals, in local traditions, which helps them keeping them and strengthen the local economies. For example running the house of Maya medicines, organising trips to the jungle, to the garden of orchids, workshops about building houses from things you can find in the rain forest, going bird-watching and many others.

From our news: Mila has two first teeth and Tom cut his hair.

And in the evening in San Angel we got invitation for some Christian meeting on the basketball field, “brothers and sisters, alleluyah” songs in the rhythm of disko-polo (beg of 90s in Poland), everybody super friendly, Hanna dancing in the middle and… suddenly some snake appeared on the field. Three big guys run to him and through stones on him. Just a small interruption of the family atmosphere…


Our first book is out!

We have published our first book (for now just in Polish:) about our Central America Trip.
See, read and order here »

2 Comments

  • Paulina
    Posted November 18, 2011 at 02:01 | Permalink

    To mnie zawsze zachwyca – jak bez uprzedzeń, łatwo, z prostotą i radością komunikują się dzieci – nieważne, że z różnych krajów, że z różnych kultur. Po prostu czerpią z tych wspólnych chwil, grzebią razem w piasku, a to kurę pogonią, a to kwiatek obejrzą, gadają każde po swojemu – a jednak jest między nimi porozumienie. A potem człowiek się starzeje i mu w głowie wyrasta wieża Babel – i musi odtąd wkuwać słówka, uczyć się gramatyki albo wozić ze sobą po świecie “rozmówki”;)

    Reply
  • maria
    Posted November 23, 2011 at 05:20 | Permalink

    I miss you guys, specially you know who…Little Hanna in the morning saying “tlaquepaque”! Love your posts, keep sharing

    Reply

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